190619, Weekly Riverside Emergency Communications Net Outline

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190619, Weekly Riverside Emergency Communications Net Outline

Post by K9LMR » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:38 pm

I.  INTRODUCTION
  • The Riverside Emergency Communication Group is affiliated with the City of Riverside's Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program and other emergency service partners within Southern California.
  • We hold this weekly net to promote emergency communications and facilitate interoperability in the event of a local or widespread disaster.
  • On this Net we share tips, suggestions and common practices related to communications, preparedness, gear reviews and survival skills that are relevant to the EMCOMM Operator.
  • Net information:
    • Wednesday at 2000 hours / 8:00 P.M
    • KD6DDM, 146.610 MHz (-0.6) 103.5
    • Owner Operator David Summers KD6DDM
  • We also provide an outline of each net at:  http://topic.rivecg.net/viewforum.php?f=2
  • Please come out, check-in and make it a point to actively participate in the discussion!
II.  CHECK-INS (First Name & Call Sign)
  • All CERT affiliated amateur radio operators
  • All guests (non-CERT visitors)
  • Late or missed check-ins (anyone who might have missed the above check-ins)
III.  ANNOUNCEMENTS
  • Thank you David Summers, KD6DDM, for the use of the repeater:  https://www.qrz.com/db/KD6DDM
    • A message from David:  "Hi folks...that time of year is coming soon. In January I will be paying the annual lease on the repeaters. If you like to donate, you can do so with Paypal. My account is subytec977@yahoo.com. Any donation is appreciated!"
    • A note from the sponsor...Garden Grove Community Emergency Response Team weblink:  http://cert.gardengrovefire.org
    • The KD6DDM Repeater System Facebook page at:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/118761278179990/
    • Garden Grove CERT nets:  Garden Grove CERT has an amateur radio net on Monday nights at 6:45 pm on the KD6DDM Sierra Peak repeater 146.610 MHz (-) 103.5Hz tone. The net is for member check in, announcements and news.  Visitors are welcome and may share information regarding CERT activities and training opportunities.
 TENTATIVE  AUGUST 16-18, 2019  BASIC CERT   HEMET
 REGISTER  OCTOBER 5, 2019  CERT REFRESHER TRAINING  NORTON YOUNGLOVE COMMUNITY CENTER
 459 CENTER STREET
 RIVERSIDE, CA 92507
 REGISTER  OCTOBER 11-13, 2019  BASIC CERT  CITY OF MORENO VALLEY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
 22870 CALLE SAN JUAN DE LOS LAGOS
 MORENO VALLEY, CA  92553
 TENTATIVE  OCTOBER 16-17, 2019  WEST COUNTY EMPLOYEE CERT  BEN CLARK TRAINING CENTER
 REGISTER OCTOBER 19-20, 2019
&
OCTOBER 26-27, 2019
 BASIC CERT  NORTON YOUNGLOVE COMMUNITY CENTER
 459 CENTER STREET 
 RIVERSIDE, CA 92507
 TENTATIVE  NOVEMBER 15-17, 2019  BASIC CERT  HEMET
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Riverside County Amateur Radio Association (RCARA):  KK6CTX Marlene, xmadamxx@aol.com, for information or the club website at http://www.w6tj.org/
    • Facebook Group link:  https://www.facebook.com/RCARA.W6TJ/
    • Weekly net on Monday night at 1900 on the W6TJ Repeater, 146.880 (-) 146.2
    • RCARA Club Meeting: The 2nd Thursday of each month at 7 PM in the La Sierra University Seventh Day Adventist Church Fellowship Hall, 4937 Sierra Vista Avenue, Riverside, CA.
    • Hungry Hams Lunch Bunch; Back Street Café, 3735 Nelson ST at Brockton to reserve a spot contact Marlene at xmadamxx@aol.com
    • Field Day 2019 Preparation:
      • N1MM Logger+ will be used:  http://n1mm.hamdocs.com/tiki-index.php
      • FD contesting, outreach, and socializing
      • FD Volunteers needed
      • Raffle and good times.
      • Displays, discussions, classes and demonstrations.
  • ARES:  http://aresnwrc.org/  Rick/KK6CTT
    • Weekly net on Thursday night at 1900 on the KI6REC, MV Box Springs Repeater at 449.300 (-) 103.5
    • Meeting:  Riverside Red Cross located at 6235 River Crest Drive, Suite A, Riverside, CA 92507 (2nd MON of the month).
  • Jurupa Citizen Corps:  KM6DPS Greg
  • Country Village:
    • Meeting:  2nd TUE of the month @ 1800 hours in the radio room adjacent to the laundry room.
    • Anyone curious or wanting to become a new member; you are always welcome to stop by!
  • Mesh Network:  
    • Testing a second “web” site server running Apache2 on a Raspberry Pi 2 that will be carried by the EDGAR asset for Field Day 2019. Site content designed by N6LMA.
    • Testing a "web" site server running Apache2 on a Raspberry Pi 1, Model B. The server is at the K9LMR node and connected to the AREDN network.
    • Successfully tested the path from the 2019 Field Day site to the AREDN backbone on Pleasants Peak.
    • For more information concerning MESH in general visit:   https://www.arednmesh.org/
    • YouTube presentation:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkl5Nbnz24Y
  • Outdoor Adventure USA:
    • Thursday evenings, 1930-2130 on the Keller Peak Repeater; 146.385 (+) 146.2:  http://www.oausa.net/ (click on "net preview")
    • Topic list:  http://forums.oausa.net/viewtopic.php?f=174&t=3722
    • 2019 OAUSA Net Schedule:
      • 06/06/19 - SOTA (Summits on the Air)
      • 06/13/19 - Field Day Discussion and Prep
      • 06/20/19 - Field Day, No net
      • 06/27/19 - Field Day Wrap-up
  • Red Cross:
    • Riverside Chapter meetings are fourth Monday of the month at 1800 hours. Meetings are held at the chapter office at 6235 River Crest Drive, Riverside.
    • The American Red Cross relies on volunteers to help us with our mission of providing care and comfort to those in need. If you are interested in being a volunteer, https://www.redcross.org/volunteer/beco ... nteer.html
    • Red Cross Amateur Radio Weekly Monday Net @ 1945 with Gordon West WB6NOA:
    • 2-Meter CLARA Network; 145.220 MHz frequency, -0.60 MHz shift with a 103.5 MHz tone  http://www.145220.com/onairevents.htm
    • ARES Supporting Red Cross exercises:
      • Regional exercise, "Desert to the Sea," (Riverside Co, San Bernardino Co and Orange Co), was scheduled for 18 May 2019. Future report by KK6CTT.
  • Kodiak Ultra Marathons Volunteers needed:  https://www.kodiak100.com/ (KJ6OEO)
    • Volunteer opportunities here:  https://www.kodiak100.com/volunteer
    • Information:
      • The 7th annual Kodiak Ultra Marathons will take place August 16-18, 2019 in beautiful Big Bear Lake, California. Big Bear Lake sits at 7,000 ft in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. The 100 mile distance will start and finish in the Big Bear Village and will circumnavigate the entire Big Bear Valley. The Kodiak also offers a 50-mile distance and a 50K, which will be run along the same track as the 100-mile race. The 100 miler will start at 6PM Friday (that's right - a night start!). The 50 miler will start at 4AM on Saturday on Holcomb Valley Road near Lake Baldwin, and finally the Back 50K will start at 6AM am at the base of Sugarloaf Mountain.
      • There will be six crew-accessible aid stations along the Kodiak 100 mile route, including the start/finish area in the Village. Pacers are permitted starting at Mile 52. No pacers in the 50M or 50K race.
      • We encourage all spectators to enjoy the start/finish area in the Village. We will have a beer garden, food and sponsor booths setup on Saturday.
      • Proceeds from the Kodiak benefit the San Bernardino Search & Rescue, Big Bear Valley Trails Foundation, Mountain Top Radio Association, and the Big Bear Middle School Interact Club.
  • Great Shake Out Exercise
    • October 17, 2019
    • Registration is open:  https://www.shakeout.org/california/
    • Utah leads California in registration by over double in 2019!  Get the word out and let's close that gap!
IV.  2019 GOALS BY QUARTER for the Riverside ECG
  • 1st Quarter (JAN-MAR):
    • Net conducted from the City of Riverside EOC:  Date TBD
    • 1st deployment of EDGAR in support of the Red-Eye Net held nightly on the Keller Peak Repeater (part of the 02/13 RIV ECG Net)
    • Guest Speaker:  N6LMA with a report on the Yuma Hamfest.
    • Guest Speaker:  KM6DPS, Greg, "Yes, I'm a Red Cross Volunteer."
    • Social Event:  Events have mostly been walks with CERT or Go-Bags in order to; 1) exercise, 2) visit and hike nice areas and 3) spend some face time working COMMs from different locations and environments.
      • MT Rubidoux walk:  01/20, 02/10
      • Indian Hills walk:  03/09
    • Ed Fong combined antenna order?
  • 2nd Quarter (APR-JUN):
    • Net conducted from the City of Riverside EOC:  Date TBD
    • Guest Speaker:  TBD
    • Riverside RC Chapter, 06 APR 2019, Red Cross, Riverside Chapter Shelter Exercise
    • Social Event:  Spring Picnic; 22 JUN 2019 co-located with RCARA Field Day 2019.
    • 22 JUN 2019 from 0800-1800; Field Day with RCARA at Martha McClean Anza Narrows Park.
      • MESH network display
      • Invite other EMCOMM and other preparedness groups
      • Jurupa Citizens' Corps
      • RACES
      • ARES
      • LDS
      • SATERN
      • CERT Advanced Communication Class
  • 3rd Quarter (JUL-SEP):
    • Net conducted from the City of Riverside EOC:  Date TBD
    • Guest Speaker
    • TBD
    • Social Event:  Gear In The Park (GIT-P); date and time TBD
  • 4th Quarter (OCT-DEC):
    • Net conducted from the City of Riverside EOC:  Date TBD
    • Guest Speaker:  TBD
    • Social Event:  Riverside Fire Department Communication Exercise; date and time TBD
V.  FEATURED PRODUCT(S)
·        Site last edited o
·         NavePoint Universal Rack Tray Vented Shelves 1U Black 14" (350mm deep) No Lip
22 pound capacity. 
In my application I want attached devices to be fully visible on the shelf.
I suggest the version with a lip at the front and back for more typical “Go Box” applications.  44 pound capacity
Amazon $24
 
 
VI.  DISCUSSION TOPIC
 
June is National Pet Preparedness Month
 
1.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Get a Kit of pet emergency supplies. Just as you do with your family’s emergency supply kit, think first about the basics for survival, particularly food and water. ü 
Food: Keep at least three days of food in an airtight, waterproof container. ü 
Water: Store at least three days of water specifically for your pets, in addition to water you need for yourself and your family. ü 
Medicines and medical records: Keep an extra supply of medicines your pet takes on a regular basis in a waterproof container. ü 
First aid kit: Talk to your veterinarian about what is most appropriate for your pet’s emergency medical needs. Most kits should include cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol and saline solution. Include a pet first aid reference book. ü 
Collar with ID tag, harness or leash: Your pet should wear a collar with its rabies tag and identification at all times. Include a backup leash, collar and ID tag in your pet’s emergency supply kit. ü
Important documents: Place copies of your pet’s registration information, adoption papers, vaccination documents and medical records in a clean plastic bag or waterproof container and also add them to your kit. ü 
Crate or other pet carrier: If you need to evacuate in an emergency situation take your pets and animals with you, provided that it is practical to do so. ü 
Sanitation: Include pet litter and litter box if appropriate, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach to provide for your pet’s sanitation needs. You can use bleach as a disinfectant (dilute nine parts water to one part bleach), or in an emergency you can also use it to purify water. Use 8 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water, stir well and let it stand for 30 minutes before use. Do not use scented or color safe bleaches or those with added cleaners. ü 
A picture of you and your pet together: If you become separated from your pet during an emergency, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and allow others to assist you in identifying your pet. Include detailed information about species, breed, age, sex, color and distinguishing characteristics. ü 
Familiar items: Put favorite toys, treats or bedding in your kit. Familiar items can help reduce stress for your pet. Consider two kits. In one, put everything your pets will need to stay where you are and make it on your own. The other should be a lightweight, smaller version you can take with you if you and your pets have to get away.
 
2.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Make a Plan for what you will do in an emergency. Plan in advance what you will do in an emergency. Be prepared to assess the situation. Use common sense and whatever you have on hand to take care of yourself and ensure your pet’s safety during an emergency. 
3.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Evacuate. Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you, if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your pets may not be allowed inside. Secure appropriate lodging in advance depending on the number and type of animals in your care. Consider family or friends outside your immediate area who would be willing to take in you and your pets in an emergency. Other options may include: a hotel or motel that takes pets or some sort of boarding facility, such as a kennel or veterinary hospital that is near an evacuation facility or your family’s meeting place. Find out before an emergency happens if any of these facilities in your area might be viable options for you and your pets. 
4.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Develop a buddy system. Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation plans and show them where you keep your pet’s emergency supply kit. Also designate specific locations, one in your immediate neighborhood and other farther away, where you will meet in an emergency. 
5.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Talk to your pet’s veterinarian about emergency planning. Discuss the types of things you should include in your pet’s emergency first aid kit. Get the names of vets or veterinary hospitals in other cities where you might need to seek temporary shelter. Also talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. If you and your pet are separated, this permanent implant for your pet and corresponding enrollment in a recovery database can help a veterinarian or shelter identify your animal. If your pet is microchipped, keeping your emergency contact information up to date and listed with a reliable recovery database is essential to you and your pet being reunited. 
6.[font="Times New Roman", serif]   [/font]Gather contact information for emergency animal treatment. Make a list of contact information and addresses of area animal control agencies including the Humane Society or ASPCA and emergency veterinary hospitals. Keep one copy of these phone numbers with you, and one in your pet’s emergency supply kit. Obtain “Pets Inside” stickers and place them on your doors or windows, including information on the number and types of pets in your home to alert firefighters and rescue workers. Consider putting a phone number on the sticker where you could be reached in an emergency. And, if time permits, remember to write the words “Evacuated with Pets” across the stickers, should you evacuate your home with your pets. Take the time now to get yourself and your pet ready.
 
 
VII.  PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
 
 Riverside Fire Department – Office of Emergency Management
Heat Kills
Up to 200 people die each year in the US alone from heat and sun exposure.
Heat can kill by pushing the human body beyond its limits. Under normal conditions, the body's internal thermostat produces perspiration that evaporates and cools the body. However, in excessive heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.
The effects of heat can quickly overcome the healthiest people, especially if they perform strenuous work during the warmest parts of the day. Symptoms of dehydration and heat illness may not be easily recognized.
Elderly people, the disabled, young children, those who are sick, live alone or are overweight are more likely to become victims of excessive heat.
The best ways to be protected from the ill effects of excessive heat are to:
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Dress appropriately (lightweight, light-colored clothing, that covers as much of your skin as possible as well as a well-ventilated hat with a wide brim)
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Stay indoors, in the shade or in cool places as much as possible, (if your home does not have air conditioning, choose a cool place to visit or stay during the hottest part of the day. Schools, libraries, theaters, other community facilities, and shopping malls can often provide an air-conditioned refuge,
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Refrain from strenuous work or exercise during the hottest part of the day, and
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Stay hydrated - drink even before you feel thirsty. The human body needs water to keep cool, which is the safest liquid during excessive heat. Drinks with alcohol or caffeine should be avoided, since they worsen the heat's effects on a body.
Never leave children or pets alone in a vehicle for even a brief moment. Temperatures inside a closed vehicle can reach more than 140°F within minutes. Exposure to such high temperatures can quickly kill a person or pet. Even on days that feel pleasantly warm outside, temperatures in a parked vehicle can raise high enough to kill. Leaving a window open will not necessarily abate the danger.
Those under medical care or taking medication should speak with their physician about their particular vulnerability.
In the City of Riverside, certain facilities are designated cool centers for people to take refuge from the heat.
Implement a "buddy system", that ensures regular checks on elderly, disabled or at-risk populations.
Pets, horses, and livestock are also susceptible to difficulties from hot weather. Animals do not perspire and rely on panting, wetting down, shade, cool earth, and drinking water for cooling. Animals cannot explain their needs, so it is up to people to ensures that their needs are met, especially during periods of extreme or prolonged heat.
 
Heat Index and Health Effects
High humidity in combination with abnormally high temperatures reduces the body's ability to cool itself. The heat index is a measure of the contribution humidity makes. As the heat index rises, so do health risks. When the heat index is 90°-105°F, heat exhaustion is possible. When it is above 105°F, it is probable. Heatstroke is possible when the heat index is above 105°F, and very likely when it is 130°F and above. Physical activity and prolonged exposure to the heat increase the risks.
Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is dehydrated. Symptoms: headache, nausea, dizziness, cool and clammy skin, pale face, cramps, weakness, profuse perspiration. First aid:
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Move to a cooler spot,
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Drink water - Heat exhaustion can lead to collapse and heatstroke.
Heatstroke occurs when perspiration cannot occur and the body overheats. Symptoms: headache, nausea, face flushed, hot and dry skin, no perspiration, body temperature over 101°F, chills, rapid pulse. First aid:
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Cool person immediately (i.e., move to shade or indoors, wrap in a cool, wet sheet),
·[font="Times New Roman", serif]        [/font]Immediately call 911 or get medical assistance
Heatstroke can lead to confusion, coma, and death.
 
 



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